Stuyvesant Town

After Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village were purchased, a group of tenants brought legal action to challenge the new owners’ ability to take apartments out of rent stabilization through the “luxury decontrol” rules which came into effect in 1993. Under that provision of the law, when rents exceed $2,000 on vacancy or when an existing tenant’s income exceeds $175,000 and the rent for their apartment exceeds $2,000, the owner can apply to DHCR to remove that apartment from rent stabilization.

We have followed the case since 2007, when Judge Richard B. Lowe of the New York State Supreme Court indicated that accepting J-51 tax benefits from New York City did not prevent a building owner from utilizing the high rent and luxury decontrol provisions of the rent stabilization law.

Our aim through the process has been to write clear, straightforward briefings on the latest news coming out of the case to make sure that people are correctly informed about this complicated and controversial issue. See all of the latest news here.

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“The Stuyvesant Town: This Is Your Home” Premiered at the Signature Theatre

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On Dec 10th 2012, CHPC’s original production “The Stuyvesant Town: This Is Your Home” premiered at the Frank Gehry-designed Pershing Square Signature Theatre on West 42nd Street. It was a smashing success!

The night began with a wine and cheese reception in the second floor lobby of the spectacular Signature Theatre. More than 250 prominent guests attended the event.

Based on the primary source documents in CHPC’s Ruth Dickler – Marian Sameth Archival Library, the play brought the audience back to the 1940s and 1950s and revisited the struggle to integrate Stuyvesant Town. Through stage reading of original news articles, …

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Inside Edge: Fallout from Roberts vs. Tishman

As predicted, the Court of Appeals decision in Roberts vs. Tishman, which found that buildings with J-51 tax benefits could not utilize luxury decontrol of rent stabilized apartments, is beginning to generate litigation on related and not-so-related issues.

One of the more surprising decisions is by Housing Court Judge Bruce E. Scheckowitz in the case of W Associates vs. Maverick Scott (Housing Court, New York County, Index No. 73831/2009, December 23, 2009).

The case involves a building (37 Wall St.) in the Financial District which received a tax abatement pursuant to §421-g of the New York State Real Property Tax …

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Inside Edge: Court of Appeals Delivers Final Word on Stuy Town

The Inside Edge has been closely following the case of Roberts vs. Tishman from Supreme Court (see The Inside Edge, September 2007 edition) to the Appellate Division (see The Inside Edge, March 2009 edition). Now the Court of Appeals has issued a ruling that finally settles the issue of whether buildings with J-51 tax benefits can utilize the luxury decontrol provisions of the rent stabilization law. They can’t.

But in answering this question the Court of Appeals has clarified the law on how to deal with this problem going forward. It has, however, not provided guidance …

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Inside Edge: Stuy Town J-51 Decision Reversed

In the September 2007 edition of the Inside Edge, we reported on the decision of Judge Richard B. Lowe of the New York State Supreme Court which indicated that accepting J-51 tax benefits from New York City did not prevent a building owner from utilizing the high rent and luxury decontrol provisions of the rent stabilization law. As of March 5, 2009 the Appellate Division of the New York State Supreme Court has reversed that decision and ruled that if you accept J-51 benefits you may not utilize the high rent and luxury decontrol provisions of rent stabilization. This…

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Inside Edge: Rent Stabilization and the J-51 Tax Benefit

After Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village (STPCV) were sold, a group of tenants brought legal action to challenge the new owners’ ability to take apartments out of Rent Stabilization through the “luxury decontrol” rules which came into effect in 1994. Under that provision of the law, when rents exceed $2,000 on vacancy or when an existing tenant’s income exceeds $175,000 and the rent for their apartment exceeds $2,000 the owner could apply to DHCR to remove that apartment from Rent Stabilization. Since the law went into effect more than 64,599 apartments have been removed from Rent Stabilization under those …

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